Your search returned 46 results.

94 points

Black Bull 40 year old 7th release, 47.6%

Jaw-dropping: Aberlour 1973, Bunnahabhain 1968 and 1969, Bowmore 1968, Caperdonich 1972, Glen Grant 1974, Glenfarclas 1966, Glenlivet 1968 and 1970, Highland Park 1967 and 1970, and Macallan 1969. It includes a 14% grain content from Caledonian 1974, Carsebridge 1970, Girvan 1974, Invergordon 1972, Lochside 1966, North of Scotland 1974, and Port Dundas 1973. An elegant, refined mélange of peach, pear, soft oak, and rose cream florals, with dark fruit, chocolate, and fine pepper. Outstanding.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2017)

92 points

Duncan Taylor (distilled at Glen Grant), Cask #3480, 37 year old, 51.5%

I am amazed by how many old, sherried Glen Grant whiskies have been released to the market in the past ten years. (Did the distillery owners at the time also own sherry bodegas, or what?) Anyway, some of these have been dark, decadent, and delicious, and I’ll put this whisky in that category. Chestnut colored, with lush fruit, treacle, dark chocolate, leather, tobacco, roasted walnuts, and cherry cough syrup. A complex, well-structured whisky.

Reviewed by: (Winter 2008)

92 points

Gordon & MacPhail (distilled at Glen Grant) 60 year old, 42.3%

Rich gold. Superb mature nose with subtle whisky rancio, mixing fragrant mango with a little mint, rosewater, and waxiness; there’s even some custard and a whiff of woodsmoke before sandalwood brings back the exotic edge. The palate is delicate with an amazingly fresh acidity that becomes herbal (basil and tarragon). It’s late summer, when there’s a sense of the year turning, and you allow fond memories to gently wash over you. £7,800

Reviewed by: (Summer 2012)

92 points

William Grant Rare Cask Reserves Ghosted Reserve 21 year old, 42.8%

A purity and fragility rarely encountered, with aromas as fleeting as footprints on wet sand: marshmallow, meringue, honey, and rose petals. A delicacy to the structure brings banana, caramel, spun sugar, and orange peel. The oak spices build slowly, making the lips throb from the inside. It’s an elaborate maze of ethereal suggestion and an apparition of calm beauty. It atrophies reluctantly, leaving tangy peels and lengthy sweetness anchored by spicy base notes. (12,000 bottles)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2016)

91 points

Glen Grant 25 year old, 43%

Glen Grant’s new(ish) owner Campari is putting its money where its mouth is. Investment in plant, wood, and an impressive visitor center is slowly being backed up with a series of new releases. This venerable example comes from Gordon & MacPhail’s stocks, but is an official bottling due out in time for Christmas. This is GG in relaxed, avuncular mode: subtle woods, amber, Oolong tea, anise. The palate is old apple, fresh plum, cream, and ginger spiciness. £255(Available at the distillery, in France, and Travel Retail in Asia only.)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2011)

91 points

Hart Brothers (distilled at Glen Grant) 22 year old, 51.1%

A welcome return for Hart Brothers. This Glen Grant is light, clean, and penetrating, with lots of gooseberry, melon, basil, and cut grass. This turns into an intriguing note of concentrated fruits; think yellow wine gums and fresh William pear. The palate has classic Glen Grant purity, with a hint of tropical fruits. Water adds another graceful layer on top, making the effect more like a rose garden…one which you keep returning to. Excellent. £66

Reviewed by: (Fall 2015)

90 points

Gordon & MacPhail (distilled at Glen Grant), 1966, 41 year old, 49.4%

There have been a lot of old, heavily sherried, independently bottled Glen Grant whiskies on the market over the past several years. This one appears to be from a refill sherry cask, as its influence is more subtle. It has aged well, showing no excessive oak, but plenty of fruit (summer fruits, dried citrus, stewed fruits, tangerine, golden raisin), balanced by polished oak, grape skin, and subtle dark chocolate. Distinctively pleasing. Don’t add too much water, though, as it breaks down. (A Kensington Wine Market exclusive.) $500 (CAD)

Reviewed by: (Winter 2009)

90 points

Gordon & MacPhail 1954 (distilled at Glen Grant), 40%

This veteran expression was fully matured in first-fill sherry butts. Fragrant on the nose, with black treacle, prunes, raisins, lanolin, bung cloths, and polished oak. Big stewed fruit and warm leather notes on the palate, soon reeled in by spicy tannic oak, plus licorice and aniseed, though a stubborn dusty fruitiness persists. The finish is lengthy and mouth-drying, with lots of dark oak. A lovely example of its kind. £1,575

Reviewed by: (Fall 2017)

90 points

William Grant Rare Cask Reserves Blended Reserve 26 year old, 42%

William Grant & Sons will be releasing a series of Ghosted Reserves in the years ahead, drawing on their remaining stock from closed distilleries. Here, Brian Kinsman has used whisky from Ladyburn and Inverleven to create a nose of zesty key lime pie, peach, butter mintoes, and sweet oak. It is truly moreish, with creamy, malty flavors of sweet mandarin, marzipan, and strawberry with a chalky mouthfeel of candy sticks that lingers through the finish. Exceptionally good whisky. (6,000 bottles)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2015)

90 points

Glen Grant Five Decades, 46%

Created by Dennis Malcolm to celebrate his half century at Glen Grant, this uses casks from each of his five decades. Pale it may be, but this is no dainty little thing. There’s lots of buttery oak before classic Glen Grant lift and energy emerge: green apple, fruit blossom, William pear, and yellow fruits; lemon butter icing and nettles with water. The palate is vibrant and energetic, but holds to the middle of the tongue. A suitably celebratory dram. Congratulations! £115

Reviewed by: (Fall 2013)

90 points

Berry Brothers & Rudd (distilled at Glen Grant) 1972 37 year old, 51.8%

This is quite different from the Adelphi Glen Grant bottling (below), being more cask-driven, but Glen Grant’s clean fruitiness remains, although transformed by age. Its apples are baked, with some added caramelized juices thrown in; we see apricot alongside dried lemon peel, and light, sweet spice. The waxiness here is akin to leather oil, while the oak has sufficient grip to give structure. In time, there are hints of the cellar — burlap and wet earth. Delicious, and best neat. £184

Reviewed by: (Winter 2011)

89 points

Peerless (distilled at Glen Grant) 1970, 46.1%

Mahogany color. Full-bodied, thick and chewy. Incredibly rich aroma and flavors of toffee, fudge, spice cake, ripe fruit, burnished leather, and oak. Nicely balanced throughout, with a long, satisfying finish.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2003)

89 points

Tullamore D.E.W. XO Caribbean Rum Cask Finish, 43%

Rum-finishing specialists William Grant & Sons add to Ireland’s league of existing rum-finished whiskeys. The lush tropical fruit complexity is abundant with mango, passion fruit, dried papaya, and green apple on the nose. Red apple flavors dominate with Demerara sugariness, dried strawberry, egg custard, and toffee chews, before drifting off into sweeter, fruitier territory. Short finish with a shot of sweet nutmeg.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2018)

89 points

Glen Grant 15 year old Batch Strength, 50%

Described by its distillers as “the most intensified expression” of Glen Grant, this was matured in first-fill bourbon barrels and is non-chill filtered. The nose is fresh and floral, with rose petals, Turkish delight, and cinnamon. Supple on the palate, clean and fruity, with developing soft toffee, pear drops, ginger, and a floral carryover from the nose. The finish is medium in length, with slightly astringent oak.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2018)

88 points

Tullamore D.E.W. 15 year old Trilogy, 40%

Here they take a triple distilled blend of pot still, malt, and grain whiskey matured in bourbon and oloroso sherry and finish it in golden rum casks (a favorite finishing vessel at Wm. Grant). A soft, relaxing sweetness emits from the glass, showing barley sugars, lemon bonbon, vanilla, and freshly-planed oak. The oloroso has been used sparingly, but rounds off the lemon, light fudge, and hazelnut flavors. There’s a spicy last stand that burns brightly. A terrific composition.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2016)

88 points

Girvan Patent Still 25 year old, 42%

William Grant is making pioneering efforts to develop Girvan as a single grain whisky brand, with more to come. The aromas beckon with masses of buttery vanilla notes, fresh apple, cinnamon stick bundles, dark peel, and chocolate pralines. The creamy, unctuous texture packs in white chocolate, citrus, lime, chewy caramels, and pineapple, with soft American oak characteristics. Long finish of vanilla, ground cinnamon, and mint. One of the tastiest grains on the market: expensive, but still, it’s patently very good. £250

Reviewed by: (Summer 2014)

88 points

Grant’s 25 year old, 40%

I was surprised to find that Grant’s blends were noticeable by their absence in the U.S. But with the purchase of Tuthilltown in New York and Tullamore Dew in Ireland, that is slowly changing; and here's proof. Beautiful, honeyed, rich, but the 40% ABV makes it the whisky equivalent of a radio DJ cutting off “Freebird” before the solo at the end. Still great, and indeed better than most competition, but not the classic it could be.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2013)

87 points

Glen Grant 50 year old, 54.4%

Deep ruby with a yellow rim. Clearly mature, and heavily sherried. A highly concentrated nose: Marmite and soy sauce, and all the fresh fruits of youth reduced to essence. Drinkwise, it’s closest to Chinato: curative barks, dried herbs (mint, hyssop, oregano). The palate is unsurprisingly thick and lightly smoky, but the tannins aren't overly astringent, and there remains a sweet core still, even if the overall effect is dark. It’s not obviously Glen Grant, but it is a fascinating glass.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2015)

87 points

Grant’s Triple Wood, 40%

Refill bourbon, American oak, and virgin oak are the woods in question. Technically, they are all American oak, just at different flavor-giving stages of their productive lives. Honey, fresh apricot, floral, and supple barley notes, candied orange, star anise, dried chili, and a touch of aniseed. Exceptionally smooth with caramel, date, red fruits, chocolate, and pecan pie, finishing with wood char and spice. One wood three ways, I grant you. Previously labeled as Grant’s Family Reserve

Reviewed by: (Winter 2018)

87 points

Scott Selection (distilled at Glen Grant) 1973, 26 year old, 58.2%

Amber chestnut color. Aromas are rich and express great depth, with highlights of ripe fruit and wood spices. Well-rounded flavors are balanced very nicely, with a gentle sweetness up front that marries well with ripe fruit, becoming dry with background wood spice notes.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2000)

87 points

Gordon & MacPhail 10 year old (distilled at Glen Grant), 40%

This expression of Glen Grant has been matured in refill bourbon casks and is arguably more characterful than the distiller’s own variant of the same age. Ripe orchard fruits on the nose, with honey and cinder toffee. The palate is light to medium in weight, offering more fresh fruit notes, vanilla, milk chocolate, and a hint of ginger. The nutty finish dries with just a hint of smoke.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2017)

87 points

Ladyburn 41 year old, 40%

Ladyburn malt distillery was part of William Grant’s Girvan grain distilling complex in Ayrshire from 1966 to 1975. It was located close to where Ailsa Bay now stands. This veteran bottling is mature and rounded on a nose of sweet pears, nectarines, subtle vanilla, and a hint of old hemp. Fresh fruit and lively spice on the early palate, with worn leather and malt.  The fruit lingers through the very long finish with oak, licorice, and slightly bitter citrus notes.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2016)

87 points

Adelphi (distilled at Glen Grant) 1985 25 year old, 55%

Old gold in color. Obviously an old whisky, but a delicate one that has subtle complexities; the balance between the dried grass/hayloft, the dried orange peel, and stewed apple, for example. Sweet and fragrant, it shows chypre notes with water alongside a more gentle floral aspect. The palate is drier than the nose suggests, quite mineral, with a lacy character. The finish shows melon and mint. Glen Grant in gentle repose.£88

Reviewed by: (Winter 2011)

86 points

Grant’s 18 year old Rare, 40%

The last eighteen months have been very good ones for blended and blended malt Scotch whisky. Shackleton and Compass Box set out in a fresh direction and there were top releases from the likes of Johnnie Walker and Blue Hanger. So quality brands from the likes of Grant’s have to rethink. This is well made, tasty, balanced, complex, and drinkable without water or a mixer. But shouldn’t a premium whisky justify a strength of 46% ABV? I think so. £50

Reviewed by: (Spring 2013)

85 points

Glen Grant, 16 year old, 43%

Thicker and fruitier than the entry level 10 year old, with greater mouthfeel and a drier finish. Orchard fruit (especially pear), kiwi, lime, and creamy vanilla, with suggestions of toasted coconut, hay, and marshmallow. Dry, gently spicy finish. A bit more involved than the 10 year old, but still with the same DNA. Very pleasant.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2010)

85 points

Murray McDavid (distilled at Glen Grant) 1969, 46%

Style: Speyside single malt scotch Color: Deep gold Aroma: Mature. Plenty of oak, but it’s clean. Coconut and citrus fruit. Background spices. Palate: Lovely balance and restrained woodiness for such an old whisky-the wood really doesn’t emerge until the end. Citrus and coconut up front wrapped in a blanket of malt, becoming dry and spicy, but not excessively so. Delicate, lingering oak finish.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2004)

85 points

Duncan Taylor Octave (distilled at Glen Grant) 1995, 47.7%

The impact given by secondary maturation in small (octave) sherry casks is what sets this range apart. Here, Glen Grant’s light fruits are given a darker twist, with some bodega notes, blackberry, and a surprising note of curry spices before milk chocolate develops; this is particularly apparent on the palate. The palate is gentle and quite creamy (cream sherry?) but it doesn’t like water. A pleasing dram. £99

Reviewed by: (Winter 2015)

85 points

Grant’s Elementary Carbon 6 year old, 40%

The black-labeled Carbon relates to heavily charred casks, which bring aromas of toffee, raisin, chocolate, dark concentrated fruits, barbecued meat, and ashy soot. The smokiness broods malevolently if you leave the glass. The texture feels too light to shoulder the flavors of dark char, toffee, spice, and dark fruity chocolate as the balance becomes swamped in smoke. It’s like a young child wearing their father’s thickest winter overcoat. (Global Travel Retail only)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2018)

85 points

Glenfarclas 27 year old 1981 Vintage (Cask #128), 53.4%

When I toured Glenfarclas in May 2008, George Grant told me that, while it is usually not their policy to stray from aging their whisky in sherry and bourbon oak casks, they have done some experimenting. One of these experiments, aged entirely in a port cask, has finally been bottled. The nice thing about Glenfarclas is that it is a rich spirit and can stand up to a good dose of port wine (or sherry for that matter). The port notes are lush, with ripe fruit (plum, red grape skin, caramelized apricot, prune) and dates complementing the whisky’s malty, maple syrup foundation. The 27 years also impart a good dose of polished oak for balance. Not as complex as other Glenfarclas whiskies of this age, but this is certainly a solid, enjoyable change of pace for Glenfarclas. (A Park Avenue Liquor exclusive.)

Reviewed by: (Summer 2009)

84 points

Cask & Thistle (distilled at Glen Grant), 15 year old, 1988 vintage, 46%

A nice example of what port wood finishing should do for a whisky. The port influence (finished one year in a port pipe) has taken what would normally have been a fairly straight-forward whisky when it is young-clean, light, and dry with subtle notes of herbs and spices-and added some extra weight along with balancing sweet toffee and full fruit, without dominating. (Bottled exclusively for Binny’s Beverage Depot.)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2005)

84 points

Scott's Selection (distilled at Glen Grant), 26 year old, 1977 Vintage, 53.5%

What is it with all these older, sherried bottles of Glen Grant from the independent bottlers, anyway? Fortunately, this is one of the nicer ones. The balance of sherry and oak is commendable, and the flavor is clean with that Glen Grant “dried herb” character still evident. Sweet fruit notes (berries in honey, peach pits, sultana, ripe grape) along with almonds and tobacco fill out the palate. Clean, warming finish.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2005)

84 points

Grant’s Signature, 40%

Brian Kinsman’s new creation was inspired by their founder William Grant, with a remit to create a malty blend of character. Digestive biscuits, malt, honeycomb, and confectioner’s chocolate melted over a bain-marie. It’s a satisfyingly rich dram, well-structured with a great mouthfeel that wanes with natural dilution. Banoffee pie, caramel biscuits, and maltiness deepen to flavors of coffee bean and molasses, leaving a teeth-coating finish of black coffee. (UK and France only) £18

Reviewed by: (Winter 2014)

84 points

Single Malts of Scotland (distilled at Glen Grant) 1992, 57.8%

The initial nose is soft fruits doused in condensed milk, which contributes to an overall impression of light toffee and, weirdly for this distillery in its contemporary guise, some smoke. The fruits manage to mix the ripe and slightly sour. Quite intense; it needs water, which calms proceedings allowing typical Glen Grant purity to come through. The fruits now have some added weight and, again, that smokiness. Intriguing! £75

Reviewed by: (Fall 2014)

84 points

Glen Grant 12 year old, 43%

A new addition to the core range, this shows Glen Grant with a little more weight, but just a little. I’ve never been one for the heavily-sherried versions. Here, the distillery’s signature green elements—spring flowers, fresh apple and pear notes are given a little added weight—apple syrup, toffee, and cooked fruits on the palate. If you’d like an alternative to Glenlivet or Glenfddich 12 then look no further. £43

Reviewed by: (Fall 2016)

83 points

Duncan Taylor (distilled at Glen Grant) 1972 Vintage, 31 year old, 56.1% ABV

I don’t normally like to add water to old whiskies, but this one needs a little at this strength. Whether you will like this whisky or not depends on whether you like woody whiskies with lots of sherry, and whether you care at all about recognizing the distillery character. The flavors are nicely balanced, rich, and very soothing in nature, but I struggle to find Glen Grant in here. Ripe fallen fruit, chewy toffee, maple syrup, honey-glazed almonds, damp oak resins-it’s all there, and it’s all balanced and quite entertaining. I personally want to taste the distillery character in my whisky. If that didn’t matter to me, I would have given this whisky a higher score.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2004)

83 points

Hart Brothers (distilled at Glen Grant), 29 year old, 1972 vintage, 53.6%

Like many older Glen Grant offerings, this one is from a sherry cask. The sherry, and the long oak aging, transforms what is normally a light and easy drinking whisky to a more serious affair. Ripe, heavy fruit dominate the palate-the sherry is very evident here, but it is not cloying. It’s quite nutty too, along with polished oak and toffee. The oak balances the sherry notes very nicely, and the whisky is clean and uncomplicated throughout, all the way through to its finish.

Reviewed by: (Winter 2004)

83 points

Cadenhead’s (distilled at Glen Grant) 15 year old, 55.8%

As this is slightly closed when neat, you have to search for Glen Grant’s classic apple notes behind a tense nose which, even with water, remains inward-looking. Thankfully, this changes on the tongue with pure, very linear (typical of GG) flavors of cool mint, cucumber, basil, and yes, apple. Easy-going from a relaxed cask, but with more substance than you’d expect.

Reviewed by: (Winter 2013)

83 points

Grant's Voyager, 40%

Molten blossom honey, almond milk puddings, and Parma violets interlaced with a fine, drifting chimney smoke compose the nose of this new blend from William Grant & Sons. Smooth, burnished orange and honey cough drops initially, then the flavor develops through more pronounced citrus and gentle spices to achieve a sweeter climax. The grain is quite evident in the harmony of the blend. The finish is long, more beeswax than honey, the sweetness finally depleted. (Travel Retail only) £20

Reviewed by: (Winter 2014)

82 points

Gordon & MacPhail Single Cask #5054 (distilled at Glen Grant) 1990 Vintage, 56.0% ABV

Here’s a whisky not seen very often in the U.S. When it is seen, it’s from one of the independent bottlers. I have always felt that younger Glen Grant whiskies make a nice introduction to the single malt category-especially for a blend drinker trading up. The whisky is usually light to medium in body and uncomplicated-with no harsh edges to be particularly offensive. And so it is with this whisky. A soft, cereal grain maltiness marries nicely with floral, delicately fruity notes throughout. Gentle, dry but malty finish, with suggestions of shortbread cookies and vanilla. A nice representation of a younger Glen Grant. The flavors are clean and tight.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2004)

82 points

Glen Grant 170th Anniversary, 48%

Four years ago Glen Grant was in a sorry state, its beautiful gardens in need of some love and attention, its malts neglected and seemingly unloved. Then Campari bought it and we have heard very little more since. That’s until now. With a new visitor center, the gardens in full bloom, and the owners determined to make it a major player, things are looking up. This limited edition 170th anniversary bottling is made up of vintages stretching back to the 70s. They include a couple of sherry butts and some peated spirit. The result is a rich malt with some buttery toffee notes at first, distinctive lemon and green apple notes, and a touch of aniseed. Midway through, it sets off in a more feisty direction, with some peat, sharp spice, and green banana skin. Beguiling and unusual, it’s a statement of intent from an iconic distillery — watch this space. (Selected specialist outlets, excluding the U.S.)

Reviewed by: (Fall 2010)

82 points

The Knot, 50%

William Grant’s answer to Drambuie is a much less sweet and higher proof Irish whiskey-based liqueur. Monster caramel leaps out of the glass with an undercurrent of cola. Caramel leads to chocolate on the palate before malt and grain whiskey undertones emerge. Mid-palate is a little hot, but it helps cut through the underlying sweetness and also features some botanicals like juniper and black pepper. Clearly a mixing spirit and probably best thrown into a cola or ginger ale.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2014)

81 points

William Grant Rare Cask Reserves The Annasach Reserve 25 year old, 46%

William Grant & Sons Rare Cask Reserves are micro-blends created jointly by Brian Kinsman and various liquor store proprietors, drawing on a choice of over 40 different single malts (importantly, not Glenfiddich or Balvenie). Quite herbal, with tarragon, cilantro, boiled candies, and unripe plums. A slow starter; vegetal notes yield to fudge, milk chocolate, orange, and maltiness, with pepper, oak, and spices in the latter phases. Stocked in only five U.S. retailers.

Reviewed by: (Fall 2015)

81 points

Glen Grant, 10 year old, 43%

Light (for a Speysider), floral, fresh, and elegant, showing honeyed vanilla and lively fruit, along with a hint of marshmallow and hay. Soft, dry finish. Pleasant, straightforward, and uncomplicated. A good clean introductory malt that’s easy to embrace.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2010)

81 points

Blackadder Raw Cask #6437 (distilled at Glen Grant) 1971 Vintage, 31 year old, 55.7% ABV

From a sherry hogshead, which is confirmed by its deep amber/crimson color. A very clean whisky for 31 years in oak, and its complexity is subtle. It’s sort of the antithesis of the Blackadder Longmorn also reviewed here. Both are heavily sherried. The Longmorn shows its age proudly, and is bold, complex, and a bit rustic. This one is clean, more conservative, and nicely balanced. You’ll find notes of honey-laced fruit, caramel, and toffee, with an infusion of nutty, ginger-spiced notes, leading to a polished oak finish. A straight-forward and uncomplicated Speysider.

Reviewed by: (Summer 2004)

79 points

Glen Spey 21 year old, 50.4%

Somewhat sidelined thanks to the presence of Glenrothes and Glen Grant (not to mention Speyburn) in the same village, Glen Spey gets on with producing fillings for numerous Diageo blends (primarily J&B). As a result, it’s rarely seen as a single malt, with even independent bottlings pretty thin on the ground. This 21 year old is the color of old gold, and while the nose initially surprises with a hint of suet dumplings, there’s a rich and dangerously hedonistic sweetness behind, which is strangely hard to pin down. Coconut cream? Suntan lotion? Blackening butter in a frying pan? Eventually it appears to settle in the crème brûlée area, along with a fruity base (sweet, of course). There’s a light green note that suggests it might be distillery character coming through, but water suggests it’s new wood. In the mouth, there’s vanilla fudge and toffee, before a hint of muesli alongside dried mango. Overall it’s a bit like eating breakfast in a new ski chalet. Showy and impressive, but for me the wood’s in charge.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2011)

75 points

Tullamore Dew Single Malt Sherry Cask Finish, 46%

It's great that Irish whiskey is thriving and William Grant has bought Tullamore Dew. But they need help. To paraphrase English football fans, someone doesn't know what he's doing. The label says this is 12 years old, small batch, and limited edition. What? The normal whiskey is a blend and there's no distillery. So what is this, and why small batch? The whiskey's a mess, too — flabby, characterless, and confused — the whiskey equivalent of a karaoke singer doing Led Zeppelin.

Reviewed by: (Spring 2013)


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