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Look North to Canada for Your Next Whisky Trip

At British Columbia's Shelter Point Distillery, whisky and the men who make it rest near the Salish Sea.

Look North to Canada for Your Next Whisky Trip

February 11, 2019 –––––– Susannah Skiver Barton, , , ,

Many of Canada's most exciting new whiskies never make it to the U.S. The upside to this misfortune? You have a great reason to make the short trek north and scoop up some fantastic whiskies. In fact, there are numerous places just a short drive, train, or ferry ride away where you can experience Canadian whisky in all its diversity. From the blossoming craft scene to established historic distilleries, plus bars, restaurants, and more, here are four destinations to dodge the summer heat and indulge in the whisky bounty just north of the border.

Nova Scotia: Craft Whisky by the Sea


The little island called "New Scotland" has lots of whisky destinations to discover.

Toronto: Lakeside Drams


Visit a hockey legend's distillery, spend a whole weekend immersed in whisky, and enjoy some of the country's best bars.

Windsor: Prohibition City


The largest distillery in North America anchors this historic whisky destination just across the river from Detroit.

British Columbia: Single Malt Sensation


Canada's southwestern corner is home toworld-class bars and a host of new-wave whiskies.

Canada Travel Tips to Know Before You Go


Be prepared before you get to the border.

Avoid an Identity Crisis
Whether traveling by ferry, train, plane, or car, you'll need to present a passport or NEXUS card to enter Canada and reenter the U.S. If driving, bring your vehicle registration and be prepared for a possible search.

Relieve Yourself of Duties
After 48 hours in Canada, Americans can return to the U.S. with up to one liter of alcohol without paying duty; under 48 hours, it drops to 150 milliliters. Beyond one liter, you must pay 3% of the value of the remaining bottles, in addition to any Internal Revenue tax that is due.

Make Sense of Dollars
Canada's currency is Canadian dollars. In recent exchange rates, one U.S. dollar is equal to about C$1.25-C$1.30.

You've Been Served
The legal drinking age in most of Canada is 19 years old (18 in Alberta, Manitoba, and Québec).

Know Your Place
Learn the basics of Canadian whisky with the Instant Expert guide or go deeper with Canadian Whisky: The Portable Expert by Whisky Advocate contributor and Canadian whisky reviewer Davin de Kergommeaux.